I love everything about this story that aired last week on KATV news in Arkansas.

First, a disclaimer: this bail bond agent, Carmen Moore, does not work with or for me and we have never met. That said, based upon the news story, I am a fan. Carmen Moore’s actions make me proud to be a bondsman.

Bondsman Carmen Moore

Bondsman Carmen Moore

Moore works for Buddy York Bail Bonds in White County, Arkansas and she spoke out publicly against her local jail’s release policies and practices. This takes courage. Sometimes it’s a safer and easier course to stay silent about issues that don’t involve us directly. This is especially true if it potentially affects our pocket book as is certainly the case here. Many bail agents are understandably hesitant to criticize a jail publicly, knowing that release officers and deputies at the jail have the potential to make a bondsman’s professional life horrible.

Carmen Moore spoke out, regardless of the potentially adverse consequences to her in doing so.

The first thing I love about this story is that bail agent Carmen Moore stated that she “just happened to be in her office” at 2:30am. It is not uncommon for us bail agents to “just happen to be” in our offices at 2:30am. If an employee of a publicly-funded pretrial release program just happened to be in his government office at 2:30am it would be to steal the office’s flat screen TV.

So Carmen “just happened to be in her office” at 2:30am when her bail bond office’s door bell rings and it’s two guys, freshly released from the White County Detention Center across the street. Carmen did not stay silent. Instead, she spoke out, at first on her Facebook page, posting the following:

“I am so frustrated, it boggles my mind how a facility can be so cruel and inhumane. It’s 2:30 in the morning, I’m at my office working, when my door bell rings, it’s 2 guys who were just released from jail, WITHOUT even a phone call.. . This happens every day!!!! One of the guys is from West Memphis, who just spent 30 day for a failure to pay on a ticket from 2004. He has on a short sleeve shirt, sweat pants and NO freakin’ shoes, and it’s freakin’ cold outside. The inmates are not notified when they will be released, they are only told it can be at anytime after midnight. so they can’t make arrangements to be picked up. This happens every freaking day. About a month ago a lady was release right after midnight, lucky for her I was at my office she had been jail for 90 days, she was in shorts, a tank top and again No Shoes, she lived in Beebe, this was during one of our coldest days. I made her some coffee, gave her a pair of my shoes I had at the office, let her use the phone and stay in my office until she got a ride back to Beebe. The closest gas station that is OPEN at this time is about a mile away. What the heck is wrong with our world…. Losing faith in people!!”

Carmen Moore did more than publicly rant. She took the time and effort to listen and learn about the poor guy who appeared at her bail bond office’s door. She found out that he is a 52-year-old disabled Vet, who served our country during Desert Storm. She found out he was unable to reach his mother, who is suffering from cancer. Carmen Moore got him coffee, breakfast, shoes and arranged to get him a ride home to West Memphis. She cared.

It is important to note that this gentleman was at no time eligible for a bail bond. He served a 30-day sentence, evidently as a result of not paying a very small fine from 2004. When he was released from the jail at 2:30 am, it was without any advance warning or notice. He was released from the jail without shoes, without a jacket and without the opportunity to make a phone call. It was 29 degrees outside. Carmen Moore thought this was wrong and she did something about it.

Following her posts on social media, Carmen attracted the attention of TV news station KATV and they published the story, calling into question the White County Detention Center’s release policies.

Here’s my favorite quote from the interview:

 “I understand people have done some crimes and it is not supposed to be a hotel. They are also living, breathing human beings. Dignity you know?”

The good news is that following Carmen’s actions, the Sheriff’s Department properly addressed this issue. They no longer release inmates in the middle of the night without a phone call and a ride or other appropriate and safe arrangements being made. Obviously, this does not apply to defendants who are bonded out and have friends and family waiting with the bail agent.

Carmen reminds us that as bail agents we really are in an amazing position to help so many people. There are resources and services available to people in need. As bail agents we are often uniquely qualified to assist. Carmen reminds us that being a good bail agent and being a compassionate human being is never incompatible.

Thank you, Carmen Moore for your own compassion and efforts and for bringing some dignity to our profession.