FBAA

The end of commercial bail in Florida?

Our demise will never be about the actual work that we do. Florida bail agents invariably produce our defendants in court or we pay a substantial penalty. We play a crucial role in the criminal justice system. Our profession serves the best interests of the citizens

Florida Bail Agents Association

and the courts of Florida. Our end will never be about our actual merits. We do our job well and always have.

Instead, it will be about our apathy, oversized egos, and purposeful ignorance.  We’ve been told time and time again to get political or get out of bail. We are not listening.

Many good men and woman who were recently employed in bail in New Jersey are unemployed today. The citizens of New Jersey are worse for it. California bail agents are on the brink of likewise being eliminated by lawmakers. Our profession is being threatened in jurisdictions across the country. It is monumentally naïve to assume that Florida is exempt.

There exists among far too many of us a profound misunderstanding about the nature of our national and state associations. The Professional Bail Agents of the United States (PBUS) and the Florida Bail Agents Association (FBAA) are not “them.” They are “us.”  They will not rescue us. Only we will rescue us.

Sadly, most of us in this profession are not paid members of the PBUS or FBAA. We do not donate our time, experience, money and resources in order to protect and preserve our very own livelihood. Yet we are quick to criticize “them” for not acting or for taking the wrong action. There is no “them,” only us.

Professional Bail Agents of the United States

The current presidents of the PBUS and the FBAA are first and foremost bail agents. They are “us.” They have each spent a tremendous amount of their own time, money and effort to protect private, secured bail. They are serving “us”. What are we doing to serve ourselves?

The surety companies will not save us. “They” will not save us. The only one who can save us is us.

We can continue with our public squabbling, oversized egos, divisiveness and willful ignorance while we wait for the end. Or, working together we can accomplish great things.

I hope to see you next week in Orlando at the Renaissance Orlando at Sea World. The PBUS summer conference is July 16-19th. The FBAA summer Town Hall meeting is on the afternoon of Monday, July 17th. You can register on site for PBUS. Florida bail agents can attend the FBAA town hall meeting at no cost.  The PBUS is also offering one-day passes for Monday and Tuesday.

We’ll be sharing good news about recently passed legislation in Florida and the continuing failures of New Jersey’s disastrous bail reform. We have classes on new and improved tazers, a new bounty hunting certification program, updates on national developments and much, much more.

Join us. Participate in saving us. We’re worth it.

Our own money makes us accountable. Taxpayer dollars and government employees? Not so much.

Florida bail agents are required to successfully complete fourteen hours of continuing education every two years. CE courses are offered across the state of Florida by the Florida Bail Agents Association (“FBAA”). Florida bail agents have other choices besides the state association for their CE courses since there are other approved providers, including some insurance companies, who offer courses.  But when agents pay tuition to the FBAA 100% of the money goes to the association. Most of the money raised through the FBAA CE courses is used to pay the lobbyist.

Who is accountable?

Government run pretrial release: “We hope defendants appear in court but if they don’t no one is actually responsible.”

So when you take a CE course through the FBAA you not only meet the legal requirement to keep your license but also are helping to fund the association that works for the betterment of all Florida bail agents.  This is the reason why I set aside one day each month to teach CE courses for the FBAA. All of the instructors of FBAA CE courses are volunteers.

Anyhow, I recently received a telephone call from a Miami bail agent who took one of the CE courses which I had taught. He was complaining that his $100 tuition check to the FBAA hadn’t been cashed even though it had been almost a week since the course took place.  I reminded him that I was a volunteer and assured him that all of the tuition checks for the course were forwarded by me to the FBAA office on the day after the class via UPS delivery. I followed up and confirmed that his check was at the FBAA office and slated for deposit the following day.  I had a passing thought that perhaps this gentleman was being obsessively frugal or controlling. Later that day, however, I checked my personal bank account balances on line. When I couldn’t identify a $9.49 charge from Amazon, I immediately called my wife to investigate the charge. (She confirmed she had purchased something.)

The lesson I took from these too ordinary small occurrences is that we pay careful attention to our own money. Our own money matters to us. Whether the government values our money is a different matter entirely.

At the same times as these two minor transactions occurred – my $9 purchase and the bail agent’s $100 check — a news story broke that $3.6 million dollars was missing from one of Miami Beach’s bank accounts. Evidently over an unspecified period of time — likely many months — someone illegally accessed bank information online and illegally transferred money from this City of Miami Bank account. They did this over and over again until they had stolen about $3.6 million of taxpayer money from the City.

With no evidence whatsoever, the Miami Beach City Manager was quick to assert his astounding speculation that he doesn’t believe that city employees are to blame for stealing the money. At the same time, two managers in the city finance department who should have noticed all of the illegal transfers were gracious enough to resign.  The city’s chief financial officer offered to demote herself to deputy finance director. Here, however, is the quote from the City Manager that left me dumbfounded:

“I don’t think that we could have prevented this, but we should have caught it sooner. This was not just one month of activity. We probably should have caught it earlier, and I’m trying to figure out if we did something wrong and where that happened.”

If we did something wrong? A Miami bail agent has $100 too much in his checking account and it prompts him to make a call and investigate. The City loses $3.6 million in dozens of illegal bank transfers over many months and the top city official says with a straight face that it couldn’t have been prevented. We care about money. Does the government care about our money?

This is food for thought as our opponents renew their ill advised cries to eliminate what they call “money bail.” The alternative to private secured accountable bail is invariably a government funded, government run program.  One of the reasons why private secured bail works so well is because we are financially accountable for the defendant’s appearance in court. And we all value money. Money incentivizes us. Money also matters to the friends and family of the accused who agree to share in the financial accountability for having the defendant appear in court.

Where does the buck stop?